Action on Hearing Loss Logo
    Total results:
    Search
      Total results:

      Victoria runs Marathon for mother who lost hearing in operation

      Victoria Briand is taking on the London Marathon this Sunday to raise funds for Action on Hearing Loss. The mum-of-three is taking on the big challenge after her mother was diagnosed with a brain tumour and lost her hearing following lifesaving surgery. Since, their entire family’s lives have changed forever. Read Victoria’s touching story in her own words.

      By: Victoria Briand | 19 April 2018

      “Well, I’ve gone and done it – yes, I’ve signed up for the London Marathon! A little crazy I know, given my already hectic lifestyle, as a working mum-of-three. But it’ll be worth it, right?

      So, why now? What’s prompted me to take on this arduous challenge?

       

      My mum, Angela – my biggest supporter and 100% my sole motivation – is one of the bravest, most humble and kindest people I know. Despite all of her own illnesses she is the first to drop everything and help her friends and family, even when at times she doesn’t feel wonderful. But as her disability is not visible people often forget.

       

      16 years ago she was diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma, or in simple terms a brain tumour. The hideous time and heart stopping moment when we were told will be etched on my mind forever and now her life has completely changed. Despite MRI scans and consultant appointments, she came through fighting. Six hours of major brain surgery and the loss of her hearing, but she was still fighting.

       

      The operation was just the start. Mum lost her hearing in her left ear and therefore had to rebuild her life with this life changing disability. She doesn’t like thinking of herself as having a disability – but it is and it has taken its toll on her everyday life, in more ways than people can imagine. Commuting and her work was near on impossible, social situations became a tiring task. And, of course, the horrendous headaches she’s been left with can leave her drained. She initially lost confidence – the hearing loss affected her more than we thought. She has to think carefully about where she sits when out and about and has to concentrate on everyday tasks we take for granted. She can no longer work.

       

      The hardest thing by far is that it is an invisible disability and quite often people forget. She looks normal, she carries on as though everything is fine. But underneath it all she struggles. It’s difficult in new situations or if she is meeting somebody for the first time. It’s hard to have to keep explaining it. It’s exhausting.

       

      Mum tried a transmitter hearing aid, but unfortunately it really didn't work for her. She found it uncomfortable and a constant reminder that she was no longer the same person. It left her frustrated and disillusioned. However, not one to give up, she went on a lip reading course which boosted her confidence as she met others in similar situations.

       

      Action on Hearing Loss has been an incredible source of valuable information and help. This charity does some amazing work and as a family we are incredibly proud to support it. I am running to raise money for all those people who are trying to overcome the sudden loss of their hearing.

       

      The plethora of advice on the website and Facebook page has been such a welcome to both myself and my mum. It’s reassuring to read lots of articles offering advice and support.

      Every single contribution I have raised will spur me on for the big day and all the  donations will help change lives.”

       

      To donate and help raise vital funds for Action on Hearing Loss, click here: https://www.justgiving.com/campaigns/charity/actiononhearingloss/londonmarathon2018



      Victoria Briand

      Recent Posts

      Scientifically Speaking

      Dr Rachael Richardson is a Senior Research Fellow at Melbourne’s Bionics Institute. We’re funding Rachael to investigate if we can improve how well cochlear implants work using light. In her blog, Rachael tells us about why she works in hearing research and what she hopes to achieve.

      By: Dr Rachael Richardson
      18 May 2018

      How does the brain change in people who are deaf?

      There are specific parts of the brain that process sound. So what happens to these areas of the brain when someone cannot hear? A new study led by Dr Velia Cardin has looked at how the brain can change in deaf people. In her blog, Dr Cardin tells us about this exciting study and why it is important.

      By: Dr Velia Cardin
      18 May 2018

      5 reasons why shopping with us is so rewarding

      It’s Deaf Awareness Week 2018 from 14–20 May and we want to make people aware of the support available for those confronting deafness, tinnitus and hearing loss. We’ve a huge range of products to make life easier, safer and more enjoyable. Find out why shopping with us is so rewarding.

      By: Helen Swarbrick
      11 May 2018

      Stethoscopes, vet school, hearing aids and me

      For Francesca, being a young veterinary student with hearing loss wasn’t always an easy experience. But she knew her hearing loss wouldn’t stop her from pursuing her dream: becoming a veterinarian. Now she shares her story to encourage others to seek advice if they’re struggling.

      By: Francesca Alsworth
      11 May 2018

      Recent Posts

      Scientifically Speaking

      Dr Rachael Richardson is a Senior Research Fellow at Melbourne’s Bionics Institute. We’re funding Rachael to investigate if we can improve how well cochlear implants work using light. In her blog, Rachael tells us about why she works in hearing research and what she hopes to achieve.

      By: Dr Rachael Richardson
      18 May 2018

      How does the brain change in people who are deaf?

      There are specific parts of the brain that process sound. So what happens to these areas of the brain when someone cannot hear? A new study led by Dr Velia Cardin has looked at how the brain can change in deaf people. In her blog, Dr Cardin tells us about this exciting study and why it is important.

      By: Dr Velia Cardin
      18 May 2018

      5 reasons why shopping with us is so rewarding

      It’s Deaf Awareness Week 2018 from 14–20 May and we want to make people aware of the support available for those confronting deafness, tinnitus and hearing loss. We’ve a huge range of products to make life easier, safer and more enjoyable. Find out why shopping with us is so rewarding.

      By: Helen Swarbrick
      11 May 2018

      Stethoscopes, vet school, hearing aids and me

      For Francesca, being a young veterinary student with hearing loss wasn’t always an easy experience. But she knew her hearing loss wouldn’t stop her from pursuing her dream: becoming a veterinarian. Now she shares her story to encourage others to seek advice if they’re struggling.

      By: Francesca Alsworth
      11 May 2018

      More like this

      As the largest charity for people with hearing loss in the UK, we understand how hearing loss can affect everything in your life from your relationships, to your education and...

      It’s Deaf Awareness Week 2018 from 14–20 May. Download and use our free posters, communication tips cards and fingerspelling cards to help increase deaf awareness in your office, school or...

      We're really proud of everyone who's a part of Action on Hearing Loss, and hope you'll feel inspired to become a part of our community.​