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      The surprising consequences of dining with noise

      It’s Noise Action Week and we’re looking at some of the ways your daily life might affect your hearing.

      By: Jessica McNulty | 23 May 2018

      Think about when you go for dinner with your friends and family. Do you miss a few words here and there? Do you begin to notice the background gradually getting louder with the combination of music and chatter?

      If you answered yes to any of these questions then you’re not alone. Nearly four out of five respondents say they have difficulty holding a conversation in a restaurant due to the background noise. There is a cocktail of noise being concocted from open kitchens, hard surfaces, and background music combined with chatter. Our own research has found that restaurants, at their busiest, can be as loud as 90 decibels. This would be similar to eating your dinner sitting next to someone mowing the grass with a lawnmower.

      This is Megan Gibbs. Megan said: "It was so noisy in Brighton Zizzi that I left feeling like I'd been to a rock concert - needless to say it was impossible to enjoy catching up with my friends.” For some being in a loud restaurant can exacerbate their tinnitus. For others, like Megan, it can prevent them from joining in the conversation.  This leads to negative health effects from social isolation with people often turning down invites to dinner.

      But there are ways you can try to turn down the noise this Noise Action Week. If you’re struggling to talk to your friends in a restaurant or finding the noise overwhelming then join our Decibel Squad here. You can alert others to the noise and find ways to take action to influence restaurants to make a change.

      Recent Posts

      Scientifically speaking...

      We funded Dr Helen Willis’s PhD research assessing ‘listening effort’ for people using a cochlear implant. It’s a subject close to Helen’s heart, as she’s an implant user.

      By: Dr Helen Willis
      13 December 2018

      A Christmas story of travelling with hearing loss

      The Deaf Traveller tells his tale of travelling with hearing loss to get home for Christmas on a train that he’s not sure where it is going. This is because the train does not have the right deaf awareness or effective communication tools for the 1 in 6 people in the UK with some form of hearing loss. Luckily, a Christmas miracle soon appears to ensure he has a stress-free journey home.

      By: Edward Rex
      12 December 2018

      Tribute to Professor Maria Bitner-Glindzicz

      Professor Maria Bitner-Glindzicz, a world-leading clinical geneticist at UCL, whose work helped families to understand the causes of their hearing loss, tragically died following an accident in September. As a tribute to her, we reflect on her contribution to hearing research.

      By: Action on Hearing Loss
      12 December 2018

      Regenerating hair cells – another piece of the puzzle

      Hair cells are crucial for our ability to hear, but we still don’t know exactly how they develop in the inner ear, or all the genes and processes that combine to make sure they work correctly. New research that we funded has shed light on how one particular gene is involved – Tracey Pollard from our research team explains more.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      11 December 2018

      Recent Posts

      Scientifically speaking...

      We funded Dr Helen Willis’s PhD research assessing ‘listening effort’ for people using a cochlear implant. It’s a subject close to Helen’s heart, as she’s an implant user.

      By: Dr Helen Willis
      13 December 2018

      A Christmas story of travelling with hearing loss

      The Deaf Traveller tells his tale of travelling with hearing loss to get home for Christmas on a train that he’s not sure where it is going. This is because the train does not have the right deaf awareness or effective communication tools for the 1 in 6 people in the UK with some form of hearing loss. Luckily, a Christmas miracle soon appears to ensure he has a stress-free journey home.

      By: Edward Rex
      12 December 2018

      Tribute to Professor Maria Bitner-Glindzicz

      Professor Maria Bitner-Glindzicz, a world-leading clinical geneticist at UCL, whose work helped families to understand the causes of their hearing loss, tragically died following an accident in September. As a tribute to her, we reflect on her contribution to hearing research.

      By: Action on Hearing Loss
      12 December 2018

      Regenerating hair cells – another piece of the puzzle

      Hair cells are crucial for our ability to hear, but we still don’t know exactly how they develop in the inner ear, or all the genes and processes that combine to make sure they work correctly. New research that we funded has shed light on how one particular gene is involved – Tracey Pollard from our research team explains more.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      11 December 2018

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      We're really proud of everyone who's a part of Action on Hearing Loss, and hope you'll feel inspired to become a part of our community.​

      We campaign for changes that make life better for people who are confronting deafness, tinnitus and hearing loss.

      Our ears are our organs of hearing and balance. They have three parts: the outer, middle and inner ear.