Action on Hearing Loss Logo
    Total results:
    Search
      Total results:

      How to protect your child's ears from loud noise

      Did you know that noise-related hearing loss is usually irreversible? And yet children are regularly exposed to loud noise from music players, live events and concerts. Even short, explosive bursts at firework displays can damage their hearing.

      By: Sally Bromham | 31 January 2019

      You can protect your child’s hearing by keeping them away from loud noise as much as possible, and knowing the best ways to avoid permanent hearing damage.

      Prolonged exposure to sounds over 80 decibels (dB) – about as loud as someone shouting – can cause hearing loss or ringing in the ears.

      Decibel Guide

      Here’s a guide to typical noise levels measured in dB – the higher the number, the louder the noise:

      • 60dB – ordinary spoken conversation
      • 80dB – shouting (this is the danger level)
      • 100dB – cinema sound systems can top 100dB
      • 110dB – a pneumatic drill nearby
      • 130dB – an aeroplane taking off 100m away

      Top tips to protect your child’s hearing

      1.  Give them ear defenders to wear at loud events, such as firework displays, music concerts, air shows and sports stadiums.
      2. Turn down the music on their players – if they can’t hear external sounds, it’s too loud for them. 
      3. Play more car games – listening to music in the car for a long time can increase the risk of hearing damage.
      4. Monitor the sound of the TV – if you have to raise your voice over the programme, the volume is too loud.
      5. Use earplugs when playing music – budding drummers should remember to wear earplugs to avoid hearing loss.
      6. Take regular breaks from headphones – 10-minute breaks will give their ears a rest.
      7. Limit time in noisy environments – try to spend the least amount of time possible in noisy places to protect your child’s ears.
      8. Test your child’s hearing – use the online hearing test on our website and consult your audiologist if you’re worried. 

      Products to protect your child’s hearing

      Our hearing protection range includes products to keep your child’s ears safe from harmful soundwaves:

      Little Prince and Little Princess ear defenders

      Little Prince blue ear defendersProtect your child's ears with a pair of noise-cancelling headphones. Made by 3M Peltor, the market leader in hearing protection, these comfortable ear defenders are specifically designed to protect younger wearers against dangerous noise levels. And every purchase includes a £1 donation to help fund our vital work.

      • Volume reduced by up to 27 decibels
      • Adjustable headband to fit children of all ages
      • Foam padding for extra protection
      • Available in blue or red.

      MORE INFORMATION 

      EarPeace HD earplugs

      H188 Ear Peace earplugsEarPeace noise-cancelling earplugs will keep your child’s ears safe without distorting the sound. They’ll still enjoy all the action, just at a lower volume. These bestselling earplugs are recommended for adults too. They’re ideal for noisy parties, gigs and festivals. Plus, they’re reusable, comfortable and virtually invisible.

      • Prevent permanent hearing damage from loud noise exposure
      • Sound quality remains optimal
      • Medium, high and max protection filters
      • Aluminium carry case supplied.

      MORE INFORMATION 

      Find out more

      For full details about the featured products, click the ‘More Information’ button underneath each description above, or view our hearing protection range here. You can also contact our expert Customer Services team who will advise on hearing protection for you and your family:
      Telephone 03330 144 525
      Textphone 03330 144 530
      Email solutions@hearingloss.org.uk
      Lines are open Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 5.30pm.

      We’re the only UK charity with a full range of products for people living with deafness, hearing loss and tinnitus, so we’re the ideal source of impartial advice. And every purchase means that you’re helping fund research to cure hearing loss within a generation.

      Recent Posts

      Gene therapy breakthrough for hearing loss

      A team of international researchers have used a new gene therapy technique to restore hearing in mice with a genetic form of deafness that is similar to a type found in people (called DFNB9). Our Translational Research Manager, Dr Carina Santos, tells us more about their work.

      By: Dr Carina Santos
      18 March 2019

      Smartphone accessibility and security

      Smartphones are capable of doing extraordinary things. They have gone from basic text, email and call function to being able to complete complex tasks like a mini computer. With all of this capability, how can they be used to improve accessibility and what are the manufacturers doing to make them more inclusive? Also, are they doing enough to ensure people are safe when using these devices?

      By: Jesal Vishnuram
      18 March 2019

      Products for when you're on the go

      To celebrate English Tourism Week, we’ve selected our top travel products for deafness, tinnitus and hearing loss. Whether you’re exploring a tourist attraction, attending an event or heading on holiday, we’ve everything you need to get the most from your visit.

      By: Sally Bromham
      18 March 2019

      Research to help improve the quality of hearing aids

      Robyn Hunt’s PhD project at the University of Southampton is testing whether computer algorithms can accurately predict how well hearing aids process speech in noisy environments, to help improve the quality of NHS hearing aids. She tells us more.

      By: Robyn Hunt
      06 March 2019

      Recent Posts

      Gene therapy breakthrough for hearing loss

      A team of international researchers have used a new gene therapy technique to restore hearing in mice with a genetic form of deafness that is similar to a type found in people (called DFNB9). Our Translational Research Manager, Dr Carina Santos, tells us more about their work.

      By: Dr Carina Santos
      18 March 2019

      Smartphone accessibility and security

      Smartphones are capable of doing extraordinary things. They have gone from basic text, email and call function to being able to complete complex tasks like a mini computer. With all of this capability, how can they be used to improve accessibility and what are the manufacturers doing to make them more inclusive? Also, are they doing enough to ensure people are safe when using these devices?

      By: Jesal Vishnuram
      18 March 2019

      Products for when you're on the go

      To celebrate English Tourism Week, we’ve selected our top travel products for deafness, tinnitus and hearing loss. Whether you’re exploring a tourist attraction, attending an event or heading on holiday, we’ve everything you need to get the most from your visit.

      By: Sally Bromham
      18 March 2019

      Research to help improve the quality of hearing aids

      Robyn Hunt’s PhD project at the University of Southampton is testing whether computer algorithms can accurately predict how well hearing aids process speech in noisy environments, to help improve the quality of NHS hearing aids. She tells us more.

      By: Robyn Hunt
      06 March 2019