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      Protect your child's hearing

      Did you know noise-related hearing loss is usually irreversible? And yet, today, children’s hearing is more at risk thanks to the loud noise from music players, noisy places and music concerts. Even short explosive bursts at firework displays can damage hearing.

      By: Ed Rex | 17 October 2017

      You can protect your child’s hearing by keeping them away from loud noise as much as you can and knowing the best ways to avoid noise-induced hearing loss.

      Long exposure to sounds over 80 decibels (dB) can cause hearing loss that may leave your child with permanent damage or ringing in the ears. 

      Decibel Guide

      Here’s a guide to typical noise levels measured in dB (the higher the number, the louder the noise):

      60dB – ordinary spoken conversation

      80dB – shouting – this is the danger level

      100dB – cinema shows can top 100dB

      110dB – a pneumatic drill nearby

      130dB – an aeroplane taking off 100m away 

      8 tips to protect your child’s hearing

      1. Wear Ear Defenders at loud events – such as firework displays, music concerts and racing and other sporting events.
      2. Turn down the music on their players – if they cannot hear external sounds, it is too loud for them.
      3. Play more car games – listening to music in the car for a long time can increase the risk of hearing damage.
      4. Ensure cartoons on TV are quiet – if you have to raise your voice over the TV, it’s too loud.
      5. Use earplugs when playing music – budding drummers should remember to wear earplugs to avoid hearing loss.
      6. Take regular breaks from headphones – 10-minute breaks will give their ears a rest.
      7. Limit time in noisy environments – try to spend the least amount of time possible in noisy environments to protect your child from hearing loss.
      8. Test your child’s hearing – use the online hearing test on our website and consult your audiologist if you are worried.

      Find out more about protecting your child’s hearing from our online shop at www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/shop/hearing-protection 

      Featured products to protect your child’s hearing: 

      Peltor ‘Little Prince/Princess’ Ear Defenders

      Protect your children's hearing with these colourful, noise-reducing ear defenders. With every purchase, £1 goes directly to Action on Hearing Loss.

      Made by 3M Peltor, the market leader in hearing protection, these comfortable headphones made specifically for children provide safe, effective noise reduction.

      Key Benefits:

      • available in vibrant red or blue
      • adjustable headband to fit children of all ages
      • comfortable ear cups fit over the ear with foam padding for extra protection
      • £1 from every purchase helps us support our charitable objectives.

      Purchase Little Prince Ear Defenders here

      Purchase Little Princess Ear Defenders here

      EarPeace Ear Plugs

      How can you protect your hearing at a concert, in a nightclub or at a sporting event? The Earpeace Noise Cancelling Earplugs have been created to let you enjoy trips out to the noisiest of places without damaging your ears.

      These reusable earplugs protect your ears without distorting the sound – and you still enjoy great sound quality at a lower volume. The background noise is filtered out, allowing you to chat normally without the earache.

      The EarPeace Noise Cancelling Earplugs kit includes a sleek aluminium carry case with three earplugs.

      Note: For hygiene reasons, the Earpeace Noise Cancelling Earplugs are non-refundable.

      Purchase EarPeace EarPlugs here

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