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      Our top five telephone alerters

      If you, or a loved one, have hearing loss it can be difficult to know when the phone rings. If you’re happy with your existing phone, a telephone alerter might be all you need. When you receive a call, you’ll hear an amplified ring and see a flashing light. Check out our top five telephone alerters to find the right one for you.

      By: Sally Bromham | 28 February 2019

      Missed phone calls is a common problem for people with hearing loss, especially when the TV or radio are on. If you, or a family member, find it difficult to hear your home phone ring, it’s worth checking the following in the first instance:

      • find out if you can increase the ringer volume
      • try changing the melody or ringtone
      • place your phone on a hard surface – this may make the ring louder.

      If your home phone still isn’t loud enough but you like everything else about it, a telephone alerter could be the answer. It replaces your handset’s existing ring with an extra-loud one. Plus, you can adjust the volume and choose from different ringtones to suit your hearing needs. For extra peace of mind, most telephone alerters also have a flashing strobe light.

      Our telephone alerters are suitable for those with up to profound deafness. They’re also useful for people with standard hearing in noisy environments and in situations where total silence is needed – the external telephone ringer can be switched off and the flashing strobe light used to see when there’s an incoming call.

      It’s easy to set up and use a telephone alerter. Most models connect between your phone and the telephone wall socket. They are powered from the telephone line, so they don’t need batteries or mains power. Others are mains or battery powered (or can be powered from both).

      Some telephone alerters can be used with a vibrating pad (available separately) to shake you awake if the phone rings while you’re asleep. Others can alert you to the doorbell as well as your phone. We have a range of telephone alerters available so you can pick the one that’s best for you and your budget. To help you choose, we’ve selected our top five telephone alerters for hearing loss.

      Geemarc Amplicall 20 telephone alerter and doorbell

      T453 Amplicall 20A great-value telephone alerter that doubles as a doorbell. It has an extra-loud audible alarm and bright, flashing strobe light. The optional vibrating pad accessory (available to purchase separately) is perfect for night-time alerts.

      • Loudness up to 95dB
      • Choice of alerts – sound only, flash only, or both together
      • Strobe light has a choice of five different flashes
      • Three sounds available for doorbell and phone.

      MORE INFORMATION

      Telephone call alert CEA-40

      CEA40 This compact telephone alerter is easy to set up and use. Simply plug it into your standard phone socket and your phone. It has an amplified ringer and visual alert so you won't miss that important call. Suitable for all levels of hearing loss – or for use in noisy environments.

      • Loudness up to 100dB
      • Sound and flash alerts
      • Two volume settings
      • No batteries or mains-power required.

      MORE INFORMATION

      Geemarc CL11 telephone ringer amplifier

      With the Geemarc C11 telephone ringer amplifier with visual alert, missed calls will be a thing of the past. No battery or mains power are needed – it connects between your phone and the telephone wall socket.

      • Loudness up to 95dB
      • Connects directly to phone line
      • Flash and sound alerts with high/low volume control
      • Wall-mountable.

      MORE INFORMATION

      Signolux Visual System with telephone ringer and doorbell

      There’ll be no more missed phone calls or visitors with this Signolux Visual Signal System which comes with a telephone ring detector and wireless doorbell. It offers total peace of mind and is suitable for people with up to profound deafness.

      • Loudness up to 90dB
      • Choice of alerts: sound only, flashing light only, or both
      • Expands into a full home-alerting system by adding other alarms and alerts
      • Vibrating pad accessory available separately for night-time calls and visitors.

      MORE INFORMATION

      Geemarc Amplicall 10 telephone alerter

      T452 Amplicall 10If you, or a loved one, regularly miss calls because you can’t hear the phone ring, the extra-loud Amplicall 10 telephone alerter is a great solution. When you receive a call, it emits an amplified ring and/or flashing strobe light. Suitable for up to profound deafness.

      • Loudness up to 95dB
      • Choice of sound, flash or both
      • Three ringtones
      • Can be heard at up to 25m away.

      MORE INFORMATION


      Find out more

      For full details about our top five telephone alerters, click on the ‘More Information’ button underneath each description above. Or, contact our Customer Services team for expert advice:
      Telephone 03330 144 525
      Textphone 03330 144 530
      Email solutions@hearingloss.org.uk
      Lines are open Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 5.30pm.

      We’re the only UK charity with a full range of products for people living with deafness, hearing loss and tinnitus, so we’re the ideal source of impartial advice. And every purchase means that you’re helping fund research to cure hearing loss within a generation.

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