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      Our top five smoke alarms

      Would you hear a smoke alarm in the event of a fire? People with hearing loss may not be woken by an audible alarm. Plus, if you use hearing aids, you’re less likely to hear your smoke alarm when you take them out to sleep. Our smoke alarms are designed to work in a ‘system’, providing additional visual and vibrating alerts. Here’s a roundup of our top five smoke alarms to protect your home and family, with 10% off from 25 – 31 July 2019.

      By: Sally Bromham | 20 June 2019

      Would you hear a standard smoke alarm if it went off day or night? Our range of deaf-friendly smoke alarms, when used with additional vibrating and flashing alerts, give you the best possible chance of escaping from a fire.

      Different types of smoke alarm

      There are three types of smoke alarm that detect smoke and heat in different ways:

      • Ionisation alarms are sensitive to fast-burning, open fires, such as chip-pan fires
      • Optical alarms are better at reacting to slow-burning fires, such as those caused by overheated electrical wiring
      • Heat alarms detect a rapid temperature rise and are suitable for the kitchen.

      What is a deaf-friendly smoke alarm system?

      Our smoke alarms can be used by hearing people, or combined with additional alerts to create a system that’s suitable for people with all levels of hearing loss. A deaf-friendly smoke alarm system comprises the following parts which are wirelessly linked together:

      • At least one smoke alarm on each floor of your home
      • A control unit or receiver with a flashing strobe light that’s suitable for waking hours and a vibrating pad that pops under your pillow or mattress to alert you when asleep
      • A portable vibrating pager that vibrates when the smoke alarm goes off. Another type of alerting device, such as a low frequency alarm, can also be useful if you think you may not hear the alarm or see the flashing strobe light.

      What is an interlink system?

      Some smoke alarms can be interlinked to a network of heat, smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. When one alarm sounds, they all go off to provide wide coverage and protection of your home. For example, you could use a heat alarm in the kitchen, smoke alarms in the living room, hallway, landing and bedrooms and a carbon monoxide alarm near the boiler. See our FireHawk and FireAngel home safety alarms for details.

      Do you need a multi-alerting system?

      Some smoke alarm systems are part of a multi-alerting system that notify you of other important household sounds, including the doorbell, phone and baby monitor. Multiple transmitters can be linked to your chosen receiver to create an all-in-one system that gives total peace of mind. For more information, check out our Signolux and Bellman home alerting systems.

      Book a fire-safety check

      A free fire-safety check is available for every home in the UK by the local fire and rescue service. Click here to find your nearest one. Tell the safety team about your hearing loss, and whether you use a hearing aid or cochlear implant, so they can recommend the most suitable smoke alarm for your needs. You may be eligible for a free smoke alarm if you are deaf or have hearing loss. Check with them, or contact your local authority social services department for details.

      Introducing our top five smoke alarms

      Here’s a roundup of our top five smoke alarms, with 10% off from 25 – 31 July 2019 :

      FireAngel wireless interlink smoke alarm

      FireAngel Wireless Interlink Smoke alarm 3

      This FireAngel smoke alarm has an audible alert for hearing people – or can be combined with the FireAngel strobe and vibrating pad (available separately) for people with all levels of hearing loss. Each smoke alarm works separately, or as part of the FireAngel interlink system, sending a signal to any other connected Wi-Safe 2 alarms if it detects danger.

       

      • Uses thermoptek smoke alarm technology
      • Offers fast detection of slow-smouldering fires
      • For rooms where electrical equipment and upholstered furniture may become a fire hazard
      • Can be wall mounted or freestanding, with no wiring involved.

      MORE INFORMATION

      FireHawk wireless interlink optical smoke alarm

      FireHawk wireless interlink optical smoke alarm picture

      The FireHawk wireless smoke alarm offers fast detection of smouldering fires. It can be used by hearing people as a stand-alone alarm, or can be combined with the FireHawk control unit with strobe and vibrating pad (available separately) to create a deaf-friendly system that’s suitable for people with all levels of hearing loss.

       

      • Suitable for bedrooms, living rooms, hallways and landings
      • Can be interlinked to a network of heat and smoke detectors
      • Built-in battery will last for 10 years
      • Alarm silence button for non-emergency nuisance alarms.

      MORE INFORMATION

      Signolux guardion smoke alarm

      Signolux Guardian smoke detector

      The Signolux guardion smoke alarm provides a loud audible alert for hearing people and sends visual and/or vibrating alerts to paired Signolux receivers for people who are deaf or have hearing loss. It includes a test button for regular testing of the alarm itself and any linked Signolux receivers.

       

      • Q-Label quality mark
      • 10-year built-in battery
      • Snap-lock, theft-protection feature
      • Easy to install.

      MORE INFORMATION

      Bellman Visit optical and heat smoke alarm

      B1491 Visit 868 Baby-Cry Transmitter

      This optical and heat-sensing smoke alarm is best suited for detecting smouldering and open fires. In the event of a fire, it emits an audible alarm for hearing family members and sends an immediate signal to your chosen Bellman receiver. There’s a low battery warning for extra peace of mind.

       

      • Optical and heat sensor
      • Transmits to Bellman Visit receivers up to 200m away
      • Five year battery life with battery included
      • Equipped with ‘toast mode’ to avoid false alarms while cooking.

      MORE INFORMATION

      Bellman Visit ionisation smoke alarm

      B1551 Visit 868 Ionization smoke alarmThis ionisation smoke alarm will instantly alert you to a fire in the home. It’s ideal for detecting fast-flaming or explosive fires which don't generate much smoke. Use it in conjunction with the Bellman receiver that best suits your hearing loss – bright flashing light or powerful vibrating pad.

      • Test button to indicate the smoke alarm is working properly
      • Transmits to Bellman Visit receivers up to 250m away (depending on the receiver)
      • Emits a standard audible alarm for hearing users
      • Suitable for up to profound deafness when used with a vibrating pad.

      MORE INFORMATION 

      Find out more

      For full details about our top five smoke alarms, click on the ‘More Information’ button underneath each description above, or check out the full range here.
      You can also contact our expert Customer Services team:

      Telephone 03330 144 525
      Textphone 03330 144 530
      Email solutions@hearingloss.org.uk
      Lines are open Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 5.30pm.

      We’re the only UK charity with a full range of products for people living with deafness, hearing loss and tinnitus, so we’re the ideal source of impartial advice. And every purchase means that you’re helping fund research to cure hearing loss within a generation.

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