Action on Hearing Loss Logo
    Total results:
    Search
      Total results:

      Our top 10 alarm clocks for hearing loss

      Waking up on time can be difficult if you have trouble hearing the alarm. There are many deaf-friendly alarm clocks available but which should you choose? We’ve selected our top 10 alarm clocks to help you find the right one to suit your hearing needs, lifestyle and budget.

      By: Sally Bromham | 28 November 2018
      Standard alarm clocks are not very effective at waking heavy sleepers, or people who are deaf or have hearing loss. That’s why our deaf-friendly alarm clocks have a choice of alerts which you can use on their own or combined:

      They have an amplified alarm – Many of our clocks are louder than standard high-street models and come with adjustable volume and tone controls. They are suitable if you have mild to moderate hearing loss.

      They vibrate – Bedside alarm clocks have a vibrating pad that goes under your pillow or mattress. On travel alarm clocks, the whole clock vibrates and goes under your pillow. This type of alert is best for anyone with moderate, severe or profound hearing loss. It’s also ideal if you’re a heavy sleeper and sometimes miss an audible alarm.

      They flash – Most clocks also have a bright, flashing strobe light as an extra way to wake you.

      Here’s a round-up of the top 10 things to consider when buying an alarm clock for yourself or a loved one with hearing loss:

      1. How do you like to be woken?
      2. Is the alarm clock suitable for your level of hearing loss?
      3. Is the snooze function long enough for you?
      4. Do you need adjustable volume and tone control?
      5. Can you see the time clearly?
      6. Do you prefer an analogue or digital display?
      7. Would a night light be useful?
      8. Do you travel often?
      9. Do you want battery backup in case of a power cut?
      10. Would a USB port be handy to charge your mobile phone and other devices?

      To help you find the right one to suit your hearing needs, lifestyle and budget, we’ve selected our top 10 alarm clocks:


      Bedside alarm clocks

      Wake ‘n’ Shake

      A177 Wake n Shake

      The Wake ‘n’ Shake is easy to use and has a large display screen. It wakes you with a flash, sound or vibration (using the vibrating pad supplied) and can also be used as a telephone ringer. This means you’ll be alerted to any incoming phone calls.

      • Four alarm options
      • Nine-minute snooze function
      • Adjustable volume and tone controls
      • Large LCD display.

      MORE INFORMATION 

      Wake ‘n’ Shake Star

      Wake n shake

      Wake up how, and when, you want with a choice of alarm combinations to suit your hearing loss. Don’t worry about oversleeping thanks to the snooze button that can be set between five and 60 minutes. Suitable for up to profound hearing loss.

      • Loudness up to 95dB
      • Vibrating pad, with two strength settings
      • 12 ultra-bright LED lights will flash as a backup to the sounding alarm
      • Unique ‘mirror’ clock display with three brightness settings.

      MORE INFORMATION 

      Wake ‘n’ Shake Curve

      Wake n shake curve 

      This clock has four alarm options and an extra-large, curved screen with digits that can be dimmed, so it’s very easy to read, even from a distance. It’s also fitted with a USB port to charge your smartphone or other devices. Watch the video.

      • Loudness up to 90dB
      • Choose alert from sound, flash, vibrating pad or all three
      • Set snooze from five to 60 minutes
      • 12 and 24 hour display.

      MORE INFORMATION

      Bellman Classic

      B1350 Bellman Classic alarm clock 

      The Bellman Classic plays a choice of alarm tones to suit different types of hearing loss and gets louder the longer it’s left on. For total peace of mind, use the powerful vibrating pad that goes under your pillow.

      • Loudness up to 100dB
      • Audible alarm gradually increases volume and changes tone as it rings
      • Alarm time always visible on the front of the clock
      • Nine-minute snooze reduces to two minutes after each press.

      MORE INFORMATION

      Bellman Pro

      B1370 Bellman Classic alarm clock Pro 

      This bestselling alarm clock has a range of clever features for people who are deaf or have hearing loss. As well as bright flashing lights and a vibrating pad that goes under your pillow, the amplified alarm gets louder the longer it’s left on. Watch the video.

      • Loudness up to 100dB
      • Nine-minute snooze function
      • Soft-blue nightlight
      • Battery backup.

      MORE INFORMATION

      Sonic Boom analogue alarm clock

      Sonic Boom analogue alarm clock 

      This analogue alarm clock is perfect for those who prefer a traditional clock face. It has adjustable volume and tone controls and comes with a vibrating pad to slip under your pillow. The alarm is easy to set, particularly as there’s no ‘am’ or ‘pm’ to worry about.

      • Loudness up to 80dB
      • Choice of vibrating and/or audible alarm
      • Vibration gradually increases over time for gentle wakening
      • Four-minute snooze function.

      MORE INFORMATION 

       

      Sonic Boom vibrating alarm clock

      A240 Sonic boom alarm clock

      This compact clock is much smaller than other vibrating alarm clocks but it still has a large, clear display. There’s a powerful vibrating pad to go under your pillow or mattress. Plus, tone and volume settings can be adjusted to suit your hearing loss.

      • Choice of vibrating and/or audible alarm
      • Nine-minute snooze function
      • 12-hour display
      • Battery backup.

      MORE INFORMATION 

      Travel alarm clocks

       

      TravelTim

      A264 Travel Tim

      This vibrating alarm clock is the perfect travel companion for holidays and business trips. The protective panel stops you accidentally pressing buttons when you’re asleep. Turn it into a bedside alarm clock with the vibrating pad accessory.

      • Loudness up to 73dB
      • Choose alert from vibration, sound, flash – or all three
      • Strap to fix alarm clock to your pillowcase
      • Eight-minute snooze function.

      MORE INFORMATION 

      Sonic Shaker

      A254 Sonic Shaker Travel

      Another popular travel alarm clock is the super-compact Sonic Shaker which fits under the pillow. The strong vibrations will wake even the deepest of sleepers and the handy pillow strap means you don’t have to worry about it falling out while you’re asleep.

      • Loudness up to 80dB
      • Choose alert from vibration, sound or both
      • Four-minute snooze function
      • Comes with a protective travel case.

      MORE INFORMATION 

       

      Wake ‘n’ Shake Voyager

      Geemarc Wake n Shake Voyager travel alarm clock

      The Wake ‘n’ Shake Voyager alarm clock has a choice of amplified ringer, flashing light and vibrating alert, so you’ll always wake on time for your flight, train or excursion. Easy to pack in your suitcase, it’s compact and lightweight with no extra vibrating pad necessary.

      • Loudness up to 75dB
      • Powerful vibrating alarm, with two strength settings
      • Strap to fix alarm clock to your pillowcase
      • Countdown timer and stopwatch.

      MORE INFORMATON 

       

      Find out more

      For full details about our alarm clocks for hearing loss, click on the ‘More Information’ button underneath each description above. Or, contact our Customer Services team for expert advice:

      Telephone 03330 144 525
      Textphone 03330 144 530

      Email solutions@hearingloss.org.uk

      Lines are open Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 5.30pm.

      We’re the only UK charity with a full range of products for people living with deafness, hearing loss and tinnitus, so we’re the ideal source of impartial advice. And every purchase means that you’re helping fund research to cure hearing loss within a generation.

      Recent Posts

      Scientifically speaking...

      We funded Dr Helen Willis’s PhD research assessing ‘listening effort’ for people using a cochlear implant. It’s a subject close to Helen’s heart, as she’s an implant user.

      By: Dr Helen Willis
      13 December 2018

      A Christmas story of travelling with hearing loss

      The Deaf Traveller tells his tale of travelling with hearing loss to get home for Christmas on a train that he’s not sure where it is going. This is because the train does not have the right deaf awareness or effective communication tools for the 1 in 6 people in the UK with some form of hearing loss. Luckily, a Christmas miracle soon appears to ensure he has a stress-free journey home.

      By: Edward Rex
      12 December 2018

      Tribute to Professor Maria Bitner-Glindzicz

      Professor Maria Bitner-Glindzicz, a world-leading clinical geneticist at UCL, whose work helped families to understand the causes of their hearing loss, tragically died following an accident in September. As a tribute to her, we reflect on her contribution to hearing research.

      By: Action on Hearing Loss
      12 December 2018

      Regenerating hair cells – another piece of the puzzle

      Hair cells are crucial for our ability to hear, but we still don’t know exactly how they develop in the inner ear, or all the genes and processes that combine to make sure they work correctly. New research that we funded has shed light on how one particular gene is involved – Tracey Pollard from our research team explains more.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      11 December 2018

      Recent Posts

      Scientifically speaking...

      We funded Dr Helen Willis’s PhD research assessing ‘listening effort’ for people using a cochlear implant. It’s a subject close to Helen’s heart, as she’s an implant user.

      By: Dr Helen Willis
      13 December 2018

      A Christmas story of travelling with hearing loss

      The Deaf Traveller tells his tale of travelling with hearing loss to get home for Christmas on a train that he’s not sure where it is going. This is because the train does not have the right deaf awareness or effective communication tools for the 1 in 6 people in the UK with some form of hearing loss. Luckily, a Christmas miracle soon appears to ensure he has a stress-free journey home.

      By: Edward Rex
      12 December 2018

      Tribute to Professor Maria Bitner-Glindzicz

      Professor Maria Bitner-Glindzicz, a world-leading clinical geneticist at UCL, whose work helped families to understand the causes of their hearing loss, tragically died following an accident in September. As a tribute to her, we reflect on her contribution to hearing research.

      By: Action on Hearing Loss
      12 December 2018

      Regenerating hair cells – another piece of the puzzle

      Hair cells are crucial for our ability to hear, but we still don’t know exactly how they develop in the inner ear, or all the genes and processes that combine to make sure they work correctly. New research that we funded has shed light on how one particular gene is involved – Tracey Pollard from our research team explains more.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      11 December 2018

      More like this

      We're really proud of everyone who's a part of Action on Hearing Loss, and hope you'll feel inspired to become a part of our community.​

      We campaign for changes that make life better for people who are confronting deafness, tinnitus and hearing loss.

      Our ears are our organs of hearing and balance. They have three parts: the outer, middle and inner ear.