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      Our partnership with AccessAble, the UK’s leading provider of access information

      Action on Hearing Loss is delighted to announce a partnership with AccessAble, the UK’s leading provider of access information. We’ll be working together to give you the information you need to establish if a place is going to be accessible for you. AccessAble has surveyed 10,000s of venues across the UK and Ireland, including shops, pubs, restaurants, cinemas, theatres, railway stations, hotels, universities, hospitals and more.

      By: Sally Bromham | 20 February 2019

      Do you spend hours planning a trip out? Have you ever gone somewhere to find the access wasn’t what you’d expected? Does going somewhere new leave you feeling stressed and anxious? AccessAble is here to take the chance out of going out. Its detailed Accessibility Guides tell you all about a venue’s access with facts, figures and photographs. 

       

      My access needs are as unique and individual as the music I like or the clothes I wear.

      Terms like ‘fully accessible’ aren’t helpful – fully accessible to who?

      Everyone’s accessibility needs are different, which is why having detailed, accurate information is so important. AccessAble sends trained surveyors to check out every single place in person and the information they collect has all been decided by its user community.

       

      Whether you’re looking to check a fact, or explore an area, get the detail instantly using the website and app. AccessAble is your Accessibility Guide

      About AccessAble

      AccessAble, originally called DisabledGo, was set up in 2000 by Dr Gregory Burke as a result of his own experiences as a wheelchair user and disabled walker. Gregory was shocked to find that the best-case scenario when he looked for accessibility information was a few unhelpful words that only resulted in more uncertainty.

       

      ‘wheelchair friendly’

      ‘disabled access’

      Not having the information he needed meant everything had to be planned and too often going out became a stressful and anxious experience. At times, Gregory felt he couldn’t go out at all.

       

      “Going out became a military operation.”

      “I was asked, ‘Well, what’s wrong with you?’ on several occasions.”

      He knew he was not alone, that millions of people faced the same situation, and that by working with other disabled people he could bring about change.

       

      How many times have we been told that there is level access in theory, only to find that there are two steps up in practice?

      How often have we found that the ‘accessible toilet’ is anything but accessible when we have gone to use it?

      How can we know in confidence, how far we are truly going to have to walk?


      How can we find out in advance if there’s a hearing loop available?

      How can we know if any staff are trained in sign language?

       

      Working alongside over 100 different disability groups Gregory launched DisabledGo’s first website in 2002. Since then the organisation has grown and developed, continually meeting and listening to its user community.

       

      By 2018 DisabledGo was used by over 1.5 million people each year to plan a visit or trip out. Thousands of people continued to shape the service getting involved in DisabledGo’s engagement events and social media channels.

       

      In June 2018 the organisation began to build its new website and IOS and Android apps, something its user community had been passionate and vocal about. It also set an ambitious target… to be helping 3 million people by the end of 2020.

      It can’t be a ‘best kept secret’, the work makes a massive difference, and it needs to reach more people. The name AccessAble is just one of the ways it is looking to do this, with a service for every disabled person and carer. AccessAble also wants to help people who face access issues for other reasons.

       

      Find out more

      For more information about AccessAble – your Accessibility Guide, visit:

      www.AccessAble.co.uk or download the free AccessAble App on Apple or Android.

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