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      Meet Kim Harbut

      As our Regional Information Coordinator and Outreach Aged Veteran worker, Kim Harbut tells us about her current projects while working alongside our Volunteers, and her experience of sailing the seas for the first time with a team of young deaf persons.

      Tell us about your role at Action on Hearing Loss What’s a normal working day/week like?


      As Regional Information Coordinator (RIC) and Outreach Aged Veteran (AV) worker. I work four days a week. Within my role I am responsible for the area of Hampshire. One of the main objectives of my role is to raise awareness of hearing loss to the public while working alongside our Volunteers.

      What are your favorite parts of the job?


      I enjoy talking to and communicating with the public. I pay attention to the concerns and experiences that the public share with me. Attending events alongside our Volunteers and meeting people is another aspect of my job that I find very rewarding.

      What are you working on at the moment?


      I am currently working to oversee my two roles. This involves carrying out my RIC duties and tasks as well as working to implement our Aged Veteran Projects. One of our AV Projects comprises of visiting clubs and organizations with the aim of raising awareness of our Charity and its values. Another goal of our AV Project is to embrace opportunities to establish a tended information stand at events within the Hampshire area.

      What are your aspirations for your project?


      I feel an important objective of spreading awareness is to encourage the public to have hearing tests. Another of my aspirations is to continue to champion access to advice and guidance for the public regarding hearing loss and how to utilising services or access to equipment.

      I am consistently determined to promote the benefit of shared experience and making connections for those coming into contact with hearing loss. I work to promote and enable channels that empower empathy and supportive networks.

      Why is this work important for people who are deaf, have hearing loss or tinnitus?


      It is important because lack of awareness and information on hearing loss for the public can contribute to a deficiency in understanding of hearing loss and deaf culture. Since I have started my role within our Charity I have responded to hundreds of enquires related to hearing loss. The work I have been involved in has enabled knowledge and information to be shared and accessed which has helped to remedy the lack of information on hearing loss and offer education and enlightenment.

      It is important to ensure that people coming into contact with hearing loss have access to support, services as well as a platform to voice concerns. Enabling people and encouraging them to build back their confidence is vital work.

      How can staff in other services support your project?


      By knowing that they are welcome to ask questions or to request information about any of our projects or enquire about any support or advice that I can provide or sign post them to that staff may find helpful.

      Can you tell us more about your trajectory with our charity?


      I started working with our Charity two years ago as a Specialist Employment Adviser across Hampshire then sadly I was made redundant in March this year. The current role I am undertaking as RIC is brilliant as has enabled me to continue working with our charity’s network and with the organization’s wonderful team of people.

      What do you like about Action on Hearing Loss?


      I really like working and interacting with people to raise public awareness of our cause and the work we all do.

      When did you last set outside your comfort zone? What did you do?


      I took up an opportunity to work with deaf young people and got to support and encourage them in taking part in different activities. I had actually never experienced outdoor pursuits myself before so this was also something new for me and a chance for me to step outside my comfort zone on multiple levels in a work role. We all got take part in Caving, Climbing, Skiing and Archery we all found the opportunity exhilarating and fun. We also sailed across to France and back. I had never sailed before but I found the experience very enjoyable I especially loved seeing how much the young people enjoyed the trip and how much they gained from it.

      By: Kim Harbut | 22 August 2019
      Kim Harbut

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      More like this

      We're really proud of everyone who's a part of Action on Hearing Loss, and hope you'll feel inspired to become a part of our community.​

      We campaign for changes that make life better for people who are confronting deafness, tinnitus and hearing loss.

      Our ears are our organs of hearing and balance. They have three parts: the outer, middle and inner ear.