Action on Hearing Loss Logo
    Total results:
    Search
      Total results:

      Hearing Health by Apple

      Hearing loss caused by excessively loud music and audio from personal listening devices is an increasing problem. In the latest version of their Health app, Apple are introducing new features to tackle the issue. They will be available as part of their iOS13.1 software update.

      By: Jesal Vishnuram | 11 October 2019

      Apple’s Health app


      Apple introduced an integrated health app on the iPhone several years ago. Originally, it gave the user information about their basic fitness activities, such as a step count. Over time, it has evolved to give users information about other aspects of their health. This includes other exercise activities like cycling and running, as well as female health tracking for menstrual and fertility cycles.

      Apple are now focussing on medical research, prioritising three main areas. These are hearing health, women’s health, and heart and mobility. They are working with the University of Michigan to look at factors that affect hearing health. The ‘Apple Hearing Health Study’ will collect data to better understand how everyday sound exposure impacts on a person’s hearing. They are also working with the World Health Organisation (WHO) to support their ‘Make Listening Safe’ initiative. It has so far identified that over one billion young people are at risk of losing their hearing due to unsafe listening.

      The hearing health section of the Health app will monitor levels of sounds, both in the person’s environment and through their headphones. It will also encourage people to test their hearing through the app. This will allow them to monitor changes in their hearing.

      Headphone audio level


      You can view the audio levels from your headphones. Decibel levels will be categorised as either ‘OK’ or ‘Loud’.

      Environmental sound level


      You can view environmental sound levels from the Noise app on Apple Watch. Decibel levels will be categorised as either ‘OK’ or ‘Loud’.

      Audiograms

      Here, you can view audiograms from hearing tests through the app. It will allow you to track changes in your hearing over time.

      Find out more


      You can find out more about the work we do to improve assistive technology for hearing loss on our website.

      Recent Posts

      Could ‘chemical earmuffs’ prevent noise-induced hearing damage?

      Researchers in the US have identified molecules in the inner ear that are involved in the damage that loud noise causes to hearing. Blocking their activity protected against this damage when mice were exposed to loud noise. These findings could form the basis of new treatments to protect people’s hearing from noise.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      16 March 2020

      Helping patients to be heard: What the new NICE guidance means for people with tinnitus

      Imagine you’re trying to enjoy a moment of silence, but it’s interrupted by a relentless ringing noise. What if this happened all day, every day? That’s persistent tinnitus, and as an audiologist, I see the impact of this condition every day.

      By: Vai Maheswaran
      11 March 2020

      A clinical trial of a new investigational drug for vertigo in Ménière’s disease - OTO-104

      A clinical study team are looking for volunteers to test their new investigational drug, OTO-104, for vertigo episodes in Ménière’s disease.

      By: The OTO-104 Study Team
      11 March 2020

      Our future research leaders

      Last month, we invited our PhD students and our early-career Fellows to visit our head office in Highbury, to find out more about the work we do, to meet each other and to meet our staff. Marta Narkiewicz, from our research team, tells us more about the day.

      By: Marta Narkiewicz
      10 March 2020

      Recent Posts

      Could ‘chemical earmuffs’ prevent noise-induced hearing damage?

      Researchers in the US have identified molecules in the inner ear that are involved in the damage that loud noise causes to hearing. Blocking their activity protected against this damage when mice were exposed to loud noise. These findings could form the basis of new treatments to protect people’s hearing from noise.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      16 March 2020

      Helping patients to be heard: What the new NICE guidance means for people with tinnitus

      Imagine you’re trying to enjoy a moment of silence, but it’s interrupted by a relentless ringing noise. What if this happened all day, every day? That’s persistent tinnitus, and as an audiologist, I see the impact of this condition every day.

      By: Vai Maheswaran
      11 March 2020

      A clinical trial of a new investigational drug for vertigo in Ménière’s disease - OTO-104

      A clinical study team are looking for volunteers to test their new investigational drug, OTO-104, for vertigo episodes in Ménière’s disease.

      By: The OTO-104 Study Team
      11 March 2020

      Our future research leaders

      Last month, we invited our PhD students and our early-career Fellows to visit our head office in Highbury, to find out more about the work we do, to meet each other and to meet our staff. Marta Narkiewicz, from our research team, tells us more about the day.

      By: Marta Narkiewicz
      10 March 2020

      More like this

      We're really proud of everyone who's a part of Action on Hearing Loss, and hope you'll feel inspired to become a part of our community.​

      We campaign for changes that make life better for people who are confronting deafness, tinnitus and hearing loss.

      Our ears are our organs of hearing and balance. They have three parts: the outer, middle and inner ear.