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      Get relief from snoring and a better night's sleep

      Are you kept awake by your partner snoring? Repeated exposure to loud snoring can cause sleep deprivation and even hearing damage. To mark National Stop Snoring Week, we’re shining the spotlight on noise-cancelling earplugs that can offer welcome relief and a better night’s sleep.

      By: Sally Bromham | 23 April 2019
      It’s National Stop Snoring Week and we’re calling time on sleep deprivation caused by a snoring partner.

      We all know how it feels after a disturbed night’s sleep – you’re tired, lethargic, bad tempered, lacking concentration and generally irritable. People who are kept awake by snoring can suffer like this every day.

      According to the British Snoring & Sleep Apnoea Association, the level of noise that starts to have an effect on sleep is around 40dB. Snoring can range from about 50dB to 100+dB. Even if you manage to sleep through the din, your quality of sleep is likely to be reduced so you won’t feel fully recharged in the morning.

      What’s more, prolonged exposure to loud noise can lead to permanent hearing loss, tinnitus or both. Any sound over 85dB (about as loud as someone shouting) can cause damage if you're subjected to it for long enough.

      One option is to relocate to the spare room in order to get a few hours of uninterrupted sleep. However, the stress of the situation can put a strain on the health and relationship of both partners. A much simpler solution is to purchase a pair of noise-cancelling earplugs.

      Get a better night’s sleep with SleepPlugz earplugs


      H204 Sensorcom ProGuard SleepPlugzIt’s not only snoring that can cause sleeping problems. Noisy neighbours and incessant traffic can also be an annoying distraction. ProGuard SleepPlugz earplugs have noise filters that reduce surrounding sounds to a tolerable level, helping you to drift off to sleep more easily.

      They reduce the sound of snoring by 24dB. Most moderate snorers are about 70-75dB – with SleepPlugz this reduces to 50dB, so sleep is much easier.

      Stay situation aware. You’ll still hear important household sounds like the doorbell, phone or alarm clock. The earplugs reduce noise to a non-intrusive level but won’t totally block it out.

      Easy to put in and the lug makes them easy to take out. When they’re not in use the small metal keyring container offers a secure storage place.

      Comfortable to wear. SleepPlugz provide an open air passage, keeping your ears ventilated and cool during the night. They’re designed for different sized ear canals so you can find the best fit; two eartip sizes are supplied, small and medium.

      Reusable and washable. SleepPlugz earplugs can be used night after night for prolonged respite from broken sleep caused by snoring.

      Find out more

      For more details about ProGuard SleepPlugz and our full range of noise-cancelling earplugs, visit: https://www.actiononhearingloss.org.uk/shop/hearing-protection/ear-plugs/.
      You can also contact our expert Customer Services team for further information:
      Telephone 03330 144 525
      Textphone 03330 144 530
      Email solutions@hearingloss.org.uk 
      Lines are open Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 5.30pm.

      We’re the only UK charity with a full range of products for people living with deafness, hearing loss and tinnitus, so we’re the ideal source of impartial advice. And every purchase means that you’re helping fund research to cure hearing loss within a generation.

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