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      Health and social care

      As a charity, we already do a huge amount of work in areas related to health and social care for people who are deaf, have hearing loss or tinnitus, across the UK.

      By: Gemma Twitchen | 09 October 2017

      For example, we run local services for people who have hearing loss, such as drop-in clinics where we carry out hearing aid repairs, befriending services and support groups, as well as information provision. We also provide care and support for people who are deaf and have additional needs living independently or in residential care; and we carry out research in health and social care so that we can campaign to improve services for – and the experiences of – people who are deaf or have hearing loss or tinnitus.

       

      To help us shape the new five-year organisational strategy for these areas, we established a UK-wide working group. One of the first things we decided to do was identify specific groups to engage with, and come up with key questions for them. We wanted to find out: 


      • How will health and social care change over the next five years?
      • From a service-delivery perspective, how can we both shape and respond to this changing context?
      • From a research, policy and influencing perspective, how can we both shape and respond to this changing context?

      So, over a period of six weeks, we sent out a series of surveys to GPs; health commissioners; health boards; people who are deaf or have hearing loss or tinnitus; and professionals working in audiology.

      We wanted to find out what they felt are the key issues and priorities for people with hearing loss accessing health and social care.

      We also sent a Freedom of Information request to local authorities in England so that they would tell us about the social care services they provide for people who are deaf or have hearing loss or tinnitus.

      The results generated from this work will be vital in informing our new strategy, along with existing and emerging evidence from the internal and external environment. Together, this information will support and guide how we decide on the priorities for our strategy in health and social care from now until 2023.

      Recent Posts

      Victoria runs Marathon for mother who lost hearing in operation

      Victoria Briand is taking on the London Marathon this Sunday to raise funds for Action on Hearing Loss. The mum-of-three is taking on the big challenge after her mother was diagnosed with a brain tumour and lost her hearing following lifesaving surgery. Since, their entire family’s lives have changed forever. Read Victoria’s touching story in her own words.

      By: Victoria Briand
      19 April 2018

      Jackie Edwards, 60, runs Marathon

      Being a busy grandmother-of-eight hasn’t stopped Jackie Edwards, 60, from taking on 26.2 miles that is the London Marathon this weekend. Hailing from Evesham in Worcestershire, Jackie has been deaf since the age of four and now wears two hearing aids. By running the marathon with her daughter, Bev, Jackie hopes to raise vital funds for Action on Hearing Loss, a charity that is close to her heart.

      By: Jackie Edwards
      18 April 2018

      The latest in hearing aid evolution

      Hearing aids have been around since the 18th century. From the earliest ear horns, they have evolved into what we see today – high tech digital hearing aids. These devices can carry out thousands of digital processes to try and ensure the sound quality is of the highest standard for their users. However, they are still far from perfect, so what comes next? Jesal Vishnuram, our Technology Research Manager, explains.

      By: Jesal Vishnuram
      16 April 2018

      Getting medicines into the inner ear and improving hearing tests – new grants for hearing research

      We’ve awarded new grants through our Flexi Grant scheme, which provides small grants to researchers around the world to support a variety of activities that benefit hearing research as well as people with hearing loss or tinnitus. Tracey Pollard, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us more.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      12 April 2018

      Recent Posts

      Victoria runs Marathon for mother who lost hearing in operation

      Victoria Briand is taking on the London Marathon this Sunday to raise funds for Action on Hearing Loss. The mum-of-three is taking on the big challenge after her mother was diagnosed with a brain tumour and lost her hearing following lifesaving surgery. Since, their entire family’s lives have changed forever. Read Victoria’s touching story in her own words.

      By: Victoria Briand
      19 April 2018

      Jackie Edwards, 60, runs Marathon

      Being a busy grandmother-of-eight hasn’t stopped Jackie Edwards, 60, from taking on 26.2 miles that is the London Marathon this weekend. Hailing from Evesham in Worcestershire, Jackie has been deaf since the age of four and now wears two hearing aids. By running the marathon with her daughter, Bev, Jackie hopes to raise vital funds for Action on Hearing Loss, a charity that is close to her heart.

      By: Jackie Edwards
      18 April 2018

      The latest in hearing aid evolution

      Hearing aids have been around since the 18th century. From the earliest ear horns, they have evolved into what we see today – high tech digital hearing aids. These devices can carry out thousands of digital processes to try and ensure the sound quality is of the highest standard for their users. However, they are still far from perfect, so what comes next? Jesal Vishnuram, our Technology Research Manager, explains.

      By: Jesal Vishnuram
      16 April 2018

      Getting medicines into the inner ear and improving hearing tests – new grants for hearing research

      We’ve awarded new grants through our Flexi Grant scheme, which provides small grants to researchers around the world to support a variety of activities that benefit hearing research as well as people with hearing loss or tinnitus. Tracey Pollard, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us more.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      12 April 2018