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      Subtitle it!

      TV access for people with hearing loss has vastly improved over the last few decades. But many programmes still remain unwatchable due to a lack of subtitles, poor quality subtitles and excessive background noise/music.

      The way we watch TV has transformed over recent years – and it’s hard to remember a time before we streamed films or watched catch-up TV. That’s why our Subtitle it! campaign is currently focused on improving access to subtitles on video-on-demand content.

      Thanks to over 6,000 people who've taken action for the campaign, in April 2017 parliament changed the law to give Ofcom new powers to legally enforce subtitles on video-on-demand services.

      Last year, Ofcom consulted on what the regulations for on-demand content should look like. Now they've made recommendations to the government proposing that 40% of content should be subtitled within two years of the legislation coming into force, increasing to 80% after four years. We welcome these proposals.

      We’ll continue to work with Ofcom and the government and may ask for your help again to ensure that this exciting development is transformed into solid improvements for subtitle users.

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      Subtitle it campaign logo

      There are 7.5 million subtitle users in the UK, but the regulator’s latest report tells us that 76% of on-demand services remain inaccessible to people with hearing loss due to a lack of subtitles.

      Thanks to over 6,000 people who’ve taken action for the campaign, in April 2017 a law was passed promising Ofcom new powers to legally enforce subtitles on video-on-demand services. The campaign has also encouraged major TV subscription services to start rolling out on-demand subtitles.

      When you complain about subtitles, you're helping broadcasters to improve their services for people with hearing loss.

      The way we watch TV has changed dramatically in recent years with the rise in popularity of catch-up TV. However, on-demand content often isn’t subtitled, which means people who are deaf or have hearing loss are left out.