Action on Hearing Loss Logo
    Total results:
    Search
      Total results:

      Our partnership with AccessAble, the UK’s leading provider of access information

      Action on Hearing Loss is delighted to announce a partnership with AccessAble, the UK’s leading provider of access information. We’ll be working together to give you the information you need to establish if a place is going to be accessible for you. AccessAble has surveyed 10,000s of venues across the UK and Ireland, including shops, pubs, restaurants, cinemas, theatres, railway stations, hotels, universities, hospitals and more.

      By: Sally Bromham | 20 February 2019

      Do you spend hours planning a trip out? Have you ever gone somewhere to find the access wasn’t what you’d expected? Does going somewhere new leave you feeling stressed and anxious? AccessAble is here to take the chance out of going out. Its detailed Accessibility Guides tell you all about a venue’s access with facts, figures and photographs. 

       

      My access needs are as unique and individual as the music I like or the clothes I wear.

      Terms like ‘fully accessible’ aren’t helpful – fully accessible to who?

      Everyone’s accessibility needs are different, which is why having detailed, accurate information is so important. AccessAble sends trained surveyors to check out every single place in person and the information they collect has all been decided by its user community.

       

      Whether you’re looking to check a fact, or explore an area, get the detail instantly using the website and app. AccessAble is your Accessibility Guide

      About AccessAble

      AccessAble, originally called DisabledGo, was set up in 2000 by Dr Gregory Burke as a result of his own experiences as a wheelchair user and disabled walker. Gregory was shocked to find that the best-case scenario when he looked for accessibility information was a few unhelpful words that only resulted in more uncertainty.

       

      ‘wheelchair friendly’

      ‘disabled access’

      Not having the information he needed meant everything had to be planned and too often going out became a stressful and anxious experience. At times, Gregory felt he couldn’t go out at all.

       

      “Going out became a military operation.”

      “I was asked, ‘Well, what’s wrong with you?’ on several occasions.”

      He knew he was not alone, that millions of people faced the same situation, and that by working with other disabled people he could bring about change.

       

      How many times have we been told that there is level access in theory, only to find that there are two steps up in practice?

      How often have we found that the ‘accessible toilet’ is anything but accessible when we have gone to use it?

      How can we know in confidence, how far we are truly going to have to walk?


      How can we find out in advance if there’s a hearing loop available?

      How can we know if any staff are trained in sign language?

       

      Working alongside over 100 different disability groups Gregory launched DisabledGo’s first website in 2002. Since then the organisation has grown and developed, continually meeting and listening to its user community.

       

      By 2018 DisabledGo was used by over 1.5 million people each year to plan a visit or trip out. Thousands of people continued to shape the service getting involved in DisabledGo’s engagement events and social media channels.

       

      In June 2018 the organisation began to build its new website and IOS and Android apps, something its user community had been passionate and vocal about. It also set an ambitious target… to be helping 3 million people by the end of 2020.

      It can’t be a ‘best kept secret’, the work makes a massive difference, and it needs to reach more people. The name AccessAble is just one of the ways it is looking to do this, with a service for every disabled person and carer. AccessAble also wants to help people who face access issues for other reasons.

       

      Find out more

      For more information about AccessAble – your Accessibility Guide, visit:

      www.AccessAble.co.uk or download the free AccessAble App on Apple or Android.

      Recent Posts

      Protecting a lifeline in Parliament

      Over 700 of you have written to your MP, asking them to protect your local NHS audiology service. We held an event in Parliament on 26 June and MPs from constituencies across England dropped by to hear why hearing aids are a lifeline – and should be protected on the NHS.

      By: Jess McNulty
      28 June 2019

      Five steps to a more deaf-friendly workplace

      Is hearing loss affecting you at work? Do you sometimes feel stressed and isolated? Our Working for Change campaign aims to change attitudes in the workplace, so that people who are deaf or have hearing loss can thrive. Follow our five steps to a more deaf-friendly workplace. Then check out our products and services to help you focus on your job, not your hearing.

      By: Sally Bromham
      20 June 2019

      Our top five smoke alarms

      Would you hear a smoke alarm in the event of a fire? People with hearing loss may not be woken by an audible alarm. Plus, if you use hearing aids, you’re less likely to hear your smoke alarm when you take them out to sleep. Our smoke alarms are designed to work in a ‘system’, providing additional visual and vibrating alerts. Here’s a roundup of our top five smoke alarms to protect your home and family, with 10% off from 25 – 31 July 2019.

      By: Sally Bromham
      20 June 2019

      Bring your Dog to Work Day

      This 21 June is national ‘Bring Your Dog To Work Day’, but for people with assistance dogs, this is an everyday occurrence. James, one of our profoundly deaf supporters, was partnered with his hearing dog, Cracker, in October 2018 after applying for assistance through the UK based charity Hearing Dogs for Deaf People. Read about his story and his tips for working with deaf people.

      By: James
      19 June 2019