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      Changing lives with the latest hearing loss technology

      The Big Life Fix programme on BBC Two highlights how cutting-edge technology is transforming lives. Action on Hearing Loss supported the Big Life Fix in finding a solution for Bobby, a person with profound deafness, to help him live the life he wants to live.

      By: Sally Bromham | 08 August 2018

       In the Big Life Fix on BBC Two, leading inventors are challenged with creating an ingenious new solution for hearing loss. At the same time, innovative products already on the market are put through their paces in different real-life situations.

      One size does not fit all

      The Big Life Fix demonstrates that it is the extent of a person’s hearing loss, along with their lifestyle, that determines which assistive products will be most life-changing.  Everybody’s level of hearing is different, so equipment that works well for some people might not be as suitable for others. That’s why we have over 400 products – whatever your needs, there’s a tailor-made solution for every situation and budget.

      Discover more:

      Bobby is 73 years old. He was born with brittle bone disease and, as a result, he’s gradually lost his hearing. The nerve endings in his ears are too damaged for a hearing aid and his friends, who have known him since before he went deaf, have never learnt sign language.

      Because of his age, his lipreading skills are failing and he struggles to understand anyone but his wife Linda. When out with friends, she has to stay by his side and tell him what people are saying, which is fast taking all the pleasure out of socialising.

      Technologist and software engineer Akram Hussein is keen to get Bobby back in the conversation. Going that extra mile, he’s even having his ears temporarily filled with silicone, so that he can experience what life is like for Bobby.

      Watch to find out more

      Life-changing hearing loss products

      Do you work in a busy office? Do you visit noisy restaurants? Are you a frequent traveller? Do you attend music concerts or sporting events? From vibrating wrist receivers to amplified conversation listeners, Action on Hearing Loss Solutions features the latest technology products designed to help you and your family enjoy a better quality of life. Here’s our round-up of all the products we demonstrated to Akram, behind the scenes, to support him find a Big Life Fix for Bobby. 

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