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Products and Equipment > Difficulties accessing banking services

AngelaHarris1
#1 Posted : Tuesday, February 21, 2012 9:30:23 PM
Rank: Newbie


Joined: 6/8/2011
Posts: 9
There was a very interesting two page article in The Times today about the difficulties deaf/HOH people have accessing bank services. Hope this link works!

http://www.thetimes.co.u...s/uk/article3326370.ece

I had my credit card blocked just before Christmas, I tried sending an email via online banking but got no response until two days later when I got a message back telling me it couldn't be dealt with by email and giving me more telephone numbers to ring (I had explained it's difficult for me to use the phone so this response was unhelpful to say the least!). I tried ringing the credit card enquiry line and was able to hear the automated menu at the start but as soon as the call went through to an advisor the volume and clarity dropped like a stone, to the point where I couldn't hear a single word. In the end I had to wait until I had time off work and could go into a branch to sort it out. Does anyone know whether text relay works with automated menu calls?
MM.1
#2 Posted : Wednesday, February 22, 2012 2:53:45 PM
Rank: Pro Member


Joined: 6/8/2011
Posts: 1,205
I'm probably the only one, but I never use online services regarding money transactions, it's too much hassle and prone to being stolen. I don't do e-bay or buy anything on the net, unless they will take a cheque. If the cashless society comes in I won't be able to buy anything really. I am fortunate in that I don't live far from my bank and they are quite willing to write things down for me if I can't lip read them, indeed when one ISP messed me about by refusing to allow anyone else to set it up for me on the phone, my bank did it for me as a favour, and also got me a rebate when AOL kept taking cash from my account long after I finished using them, since got the same back for me when SKY tried the same dodge.. I can see the bank point in refusing text messages and e-mails, I've been online long enough to see neither are safe ways of communicating money matters.

It can be difficult for BSL users to access banks, but using family would be a no-no for me ! I can't phone at all verbally, although my speech is good I can't hear any response so never use it on that basis. I can't blame the bank for that. My bank is OK any calls needed, they make them and don't charge me.
Cornishandy
#3 Posted : Wednesday, February 22, 2012 4:54:37 PM
Rank: Pro Member


Joined: 11/10/2011
Posts: 1,458
Unfortunately the link doesn't work. They want me to pay £2.

Well, living as I do in the middle of nowhere it can be very difficult indeed to do anything out of the ordinary. That is to say anything outside the immediate needs of a sleepy market town. In these remote places the level of service is often very much below what you would expect in cities, we have a saying ... London is a long way away. So people often put up with a lot of nonsense and the banks have been no exception in the past.

In recent years their customer service has improved immensely and the various disability acts have helped that to take place. Although in the past it was possible to find members of staff who will go the extra mile to help a deaf person this was a matter of luck. I once changed banks because I did not like the rudeness of the staff. I am now with another major bank who are very much more helpful and their standard of customer service is excellent.
I do my banking online and such questions as I have had have been answered promptly and accurately. I also set up an ISA and a share dealing account to hold some shares that I inherited. This can all be done online. No phone calls needed. In the past having to phone people has been a huge obstacle to getting anything done, banks included but now I am independent. Great!

There have been a few problems, not with my local branch but with the Head Office. My credit card was stopped because someone tried to defraud me but they caught him. So then I go an email saying "Please phone us urgently to confirm your credit card account details" and no alternative. I was pretty fed up about this because I can only use Text Relay.

So anyway long story short, I got through to them and they refused the call on security grounds because a third party (the Relay Op) was involved. So I asked for a supervisor to be consulted and politely explained that they were in the wrong. After a long pause I got the answer that a customer advisor would speak to me directly using Text Relay. Time taken to weave through their system, along with waiting for an advisor ... 80 minutes and two cups of coffee.

I had a similar experience when I had to ring their shareholding department about something urgent. Again there was no phone alternative. Again I politely explained the DDA to them and they agreed to deal with me. If it was not for the fact that I was able to quote the law at them I don't think I would have got anywhere.

I have also been refused by my insurance company, a building society and the CSA but all of them surrendered without a shot when I quoted the law to them. The CSA were very bloody minded, I had to go and see them at the local office, after which they agreed to converse via Text Relay. As it happened nothing more came of it but that's another long story.

I am happy with online banking now that I have got the hang of the way it works. It is not always simple for security reasons but on the other hand they often don't provide an alternative to the phone. And that really annoys me!

MM.1
#4 Posted : Thursday, February 23, 2012 5:02:29 PM
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Joined: 6/8/2011
Posts: 1,205
There seems a fair number of deaf and HI who do not agree Banks are making life hard for us, obviously those in remote areas will find difficulty, the issue sees to be a lot of us haven't the confidence to go to a bank and put themselves on the line there to explain their communication difficulties and want to do it remotely to avoid hassle, but there need not be the hassle if you front up, certainly if banks do not see you have an issue then they won't move to meet their obligation.

As regards to the alternative to the phone, what is there ? e-commerce is a total lottery and danger for unaware deaf and hearing alike. I'm never convinced and neither are banks, online is safe enough. As we get older so does the techno awareness get more unintelligible. One error some hacker is going to take the lot...
Cornishandy
#5 Posted : Thursday, February 23, 2012 6:58:12 PM
Rank: Pro Member


Joined: 11/10/2011
Posts: 1,458
This was on Facebook yesterday, posted by AOHL Admin. Surprising they didn't post it here!

Quote:

We've had a staggering response to our findings that half the people we surveyed are not happy with the ways their bank communicates with them.

You've been telling us here, and on Twitter, just how dreadfully some banks are treating people who are deaf or have a hearing loss. Some said it is 'the bane of my life', 'very frustrating' and leaves them feeling like they have 'no options'.

Do you think that banks and building societies are compliant with the Equality Act? Do you find them accessible?

You can help us show how big an issue this really is by telling us your experiences! Tell us your views here, on twitter or email us!
AngelaHarris1
#6 Posted : Thursday, February 23, 2012 8:35:03 PM
Rank: Newbie


Joined: 6/8/2011
Posts: 9
Sorry the link doesn't work, I realised later you have to be a Times subscriber to access the site. However, the article has been transcribed on the Home page here at AOHL, look for the 'Banks face massive payouts to deaf customers' headline.

I think it's really encouraging to see such a big article in a national newspaper about access to services for the deaf/HOH.
Cornishandy
#7 Posted : Friday, February 24, 2012 7:49:56 AM
Rank: Pro Member


Joined: 11/10/2011
Posts: 1,458
Yes, very much so. Considering the number of people that are affected you would think that deafness would be much more widely discussed than it is.

I remember years ago when it was only discussed in hushed tones and preferably behind the deaf person's back. Decisions were made about our lives which we had no part in. No allowances were made that we have to live a little differently from the rest. Banks especially were horribly uncompromising "for security reasons" but actually I think they couldn't be bothered.
Things have at least moved on from that point but that's partly as a result of the wider disability awareness movement which has many more members and consequently more clout. It's time that hearing loss sufferers generally and deafness in particular became more independent of that and made the facts more public.

I would like to see:
More deaf representation on TV. If the other major charities can maintain a high level of appearances on TV and radio then so should AOHL. In the past they have not appeared much and certainly not as often as medical charities. Yet deafness affects many more people. So we deserve a wider audience than we get.

A higher degree of representation in Parliament. Although many MP's agree about deafness it's pretty obvious that many do not really care. Otherwise there would have been big changes without all this campaigning. So I think wider awareness and public pressure on our legislators is needed. This is something that affects a lot of people, they need to take notice. Make sure we don't get left out of PIP like they did with DLA!

Councils also need to be tackled. They are by no means as benevolent as they make out. Some deaf people have been treated very unfairly as a result of basic misunderstandings about the nature of deaf life.

There is still a great deal of ignorance and prejudice against deaf people and that needs to be addressed. This is the age of communications. Let's communicate!
MM.1
#8 Posted : Friday, February 24, 2012 7:59:49 AM
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Joined: 6/8/2011
Posts: 1,205
Having heavily lobbied and used media to draw attention to its shortcomings, see what can be achieved by real lobbying. http://byddarcymru.blogs...-proposals-for-our.html Shortly and along with AOHL and my MP we will be seeing our local SS censored and issued a warning over their abandonment of support to the sensory impaired. Near ALL this lobbying was instigated by solitary individuals with few groups doing anything, what are they for ? I agree we need to lobby hard, but the grass roots are sitting on their behinds mostly. As regards to Banks I get no issues, I still think the main reason for poor access is the apathetic attitudes many groups and individuals take in righting the wrongs. They sit there assuming we have rights, then do nothing until they find they aren't there ,and then STILL do nothing but moan on twitter expecting others to fight for them, I sometimes yearn for the time we got so outraged at no rights we went out and fought for them.... Now we are outraged if others don't do it for us.
AJCJAJ
#9 Posted : Friday, February 24, 2012 2:24:11 PM
Rank: Newbie


Joined: 6/8/2011
Posts: 14
Try National Savings. First I had to write off to them to create an online account (yes, really!). I had problems with a transaction and it said you can email us if you like but we will only deal with general enquiries, no account details. I emailed, explained that I cannot use the phone, also dropped in that I cannot use "Typetalk" as they all still call it so please don't suggest that. Nobody is sure what it is, just that it magically makes deaf problems go away. I said if you really can't respond to me via email maybe you can write me a letter... which is as prone to nobbling as emails, faxes, all the other "non-secure" methods of communication. They wrote to me with a username and password and everything, went through the online account set-up process: You must enter a telephone number, we will telephone you to confirm certain transactions. Phone number will only take 11 digits and must start with a zero, so couldn't put in a relay prefix even if I had the necessary kit to use text relay and the desire to die of old age while someone with the typing skills of a chimpanzee search and stabs at the txd keyboard and wanted to pay for calls that I would get free if only I didn't use relay!!

Complained to them again, by email, that their insistence on telephoning you to confirm transactions excludes deaf people from their service. Am expecting "Well you can also write to us" to land on my doorstep in about 5 days' time. Yeah, cos I want to do my business at the pace of a second class letter (what they send) rather than at the speed of fibre-optic broadband. It's about equality, not "some kind of service some way". They have not yet said "can't someone do it for you" but if they do they will receive my usual practiced responses. They will not enjoy them.

Honestly, their website asks for a username, a password containing at least one upper case, one lower case, one digit and one special character, then 5 security questions, yet they want to phone someone whose voice they have never heard therefore have no way to know it's any more likely to be that person, on a number input by the person who is logged in online and which can be SEEN by the potential fraudster while online, but when they phone you to ask you the same questions you were just asked online that will be so much more secure. Stupid much?

More intrigued by this £100 compensation to buy a "mobile textphone" with. The only model I have seen only works in America, only works with phones which have a 2.5mm jack and is £235. I Googled and found both O2 and Vodafone referenced that you can buy a mobile textphone but had no links to what kind of phone it is and where one might purchase it. I get free calls on my mobile, I would be less annoyed by spending hours attached to text relay. Slightly less annoyed.
MM.1
#10 Posted : Friday, February 24, 2012 3:31:48 PM
Rank: Pro Member


Joined: 6/8/2011
Posts: 1,205
Tends to indicate the level of insecurity even the most savvy banks have, of an account being hacked via telephone or computer links.

My local SS advised deaf people NOT to use Minicoms, they BLOCKED me asking local medias to spread the word about the contact number because 999 were afraid they would get the system abused, it was blocked for a YEAR before they realised it didn't happen. Where personal details are concerned no-one trusts online. Currently we REGISTER with the police services, that then enables the relevant services to feel safer they are getting calls from the people who are genuine, and are who they say they are, perhaps Banks and others could adopt the same modus with deaf and HI ? Also they told us categorically never to issue the text number to anyone else. Deaf refused outright.

deaf and HI are just not aware enough of the security issues. read Facebook or twitter etc to see they tell everyone everything regardless who logs in. Thieves don't have to go in your rubbish bin to get your finance details, you put it on-line and make it easy for them, then complain at the security levels required to make it safe. Who HASN'T had an e-mail from a 'Bank' asking for your details because of some change or other ? NO BANK does that ! I know they are false immediately because I don't DO on-line banking.
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