Tinnitus

A new drug for tinnitus?

Posted on: Tuesday, July 14, 2015 by heloise heau

Portrait image of Tracey Pollard.Researchers in the US have been investigating a new drug developed to treat epilepsy, to see if it might also be useful in preventing tinnitus. Tracey Pollard, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us more.

 

Making research accessible to everyone

Posted on: Wednesday, April 15, 2015 by Tracey Pollard
Carly LawlerCarly Lawler is a PhD student at the NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit. She recently entered the Access to Understanding science writing competition, where entrants are challenged to write a plain English summary of a published research article. She wrote a summary of one of our research papers about tinnitus, which is reproduced below.

Can you hear the talent?

Posted on: Thursday, March 19, 2015 by Lola Olson

Ola Ahmed EbbiaryVolunteer Ola Ahmed-Ebbiary discovered Action on Hearing Loss and the work we do and decided to put on a Loud Music Event where she educated audiences on the importance of protecting their hearing and raising money.

Hearing loss affects one in six people in the UK. It can take individuals up to ten years to address their hearing loss and tinnitus can affect every aspect of a person's life. Help us raise awareness of the importance of protecting your hearing and help us fund biomedical research.

A new treatment for Ménière’s disease in sight?

Posted on: Wednesday, March 11, 2015 by Lola Olson

Ménière’s disease causes severe dizziness and tinnitus and affects 1 in 1,000 people in the UK. AltNicola Robas imagehough it can be managed effectively, there is currently no cure.

Nicola Robas, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us more about Ménière’s and about a clinical trial testing a new treatment.

Tinnitus and hidden hearing loss - is there a link?

Posted on: Monday, February 16, 2015 by Tracey Pollard
Roland Schaette is a tinnitus researcher based at the UCL Ear Institute. Here, he tells us about some of the latest research, including his own Action on Hearing Loss-funded research, into tinnitus and ‘hidden hearing loss’.

Living with Tinnitus: Building a toolkit

Posted on: Friday, January 30, 2015 by Alan Jones

Bev Frowen56-year-old Bev Frowen from Rhondda CynonTaf near Cardiff developed tinnitus in 2011. A mother of three grown up children with a demanding career, the experience made Bev take stock of her life. She now copes with her tinnitus and wants others to find a “toolkit” that can work for them, avoiding the negativity that often surrounds the condition.

Running North

Posted on: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 by Alan Jones

Amy HandleyAmy Handley discovered just before Christmas that she had hearing loss in both ears and tinnitus. Amy wanted to explain how she felt before she found out about her hearing loss and how she feels now.

Since the diagnosis Amy has also decided to run the Great North Run in order to raise money for Action on Hearing Loss.

Vagus nerve stimulation - a new treatment for tinnitus?

Posted on: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 by Sarah Wenban

Nicola Robas imageResearchers at four centres across America are about to start a clinical trial to test a new technology which uses nerve stimulation and audio tone therapy to “rewire” specific parts of the brain to treat tinnitus.

Nicola Robas, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us more about what vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is and how it might be able to help people with tinnitus.

Successful partnerships bring a boost to UK hearing research

Posted on: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 by Sarah Wenban

Photo of Deb HallProfessor Deborah Hall is the Director of the Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, a unit dedicated to clinical research into hearing loss and tinnitus. 

She tells us about how our funding has boosted the work that they do, and about a new clinical trial based at the Unit, testing a potential treatment for tinnitus.

My 48 hour sponsored silence to take on tinnitus

Posted on: Friday, October 24, 2014 by james robins

Portrait photo of Eddie Leader.Loud music can permanently damage your hearing and cause tinnitus, but many clubbers and gig-goers continue to take risks by going to live events without wearing earplugs.

DJ and producer, Eddie Leader, tells us how tinnitus has affected him and why he’s taking on a 48 hour sponsored silence challenge to raise awareness and vital funds to help us silence tinnitus for good.

Masking your tinnitus

Posted on: Friday, February 7, 2014 by Hannah Moysey

Kevin Taylor from our products teamThis week is Tinnitus Awareness Week. Tinnitus can have an intrusive effect on your life, but it doesn’t have to be this way. There are many different therapies and products to help you manage your tinnitus so that it has little or no impact on your life.

One of these is masking; the use of relaxing therapy sounds to help mask the sound of your tinnitus.

In our latest blog, our technology guru Kevin Taylor explains the benefits of using masking therapy.

We wish you a Merry Christmas

Posted on: Thursday, December 19, 2013 by Hannah Moysey

Paul Breckell, Chief Executive of Action on Hearing LossIt's that time of year again when we look back on everything we have done throughout 2013.

Our Chief Executive, Paul Breckell, and service users in Bath would like to wish you a very Merry Christmas.

Behind the scenes of our Loud Music campaign

Posted on: Thursday, May 3, 2012 by Louis Adamou

Loud Music campaign.Welcome behind the scenes of the Loud Music campaign.

We had a lot of fun shooting the campaign ad and posters, but we didn’t forget the important message behind it – Loud Music causes hearing damage, so if you want to keep listening, you need to protect your ears.

Bring your family together

Posted on: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 by Tony Kinson
Two women at an eventDid you enjoy spending time with your family over Christmas? For those with hearing loss, it’s important to spend time with family and also to be able to communicate comfortably.

That’s why, in January you can ensure you family stays together all year round. You may be thinking, Christmas was great, but what next?