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      Social media monitoring

      When I was asked to find out what people with hearing loss, tinnitus and deafness were saying about their day-to-day experiences on social media, I had no idea what I would discover.

      By: Nathalie Sfakianos | 09 October 2017

      I’m familiar with Facebook, but had not used forums or regularly read any blogs, and had never signed up to Twitter. The breadth, depth and intensity of the conversation took me completely by surprise. 

      At an early stage I was struck by the fact that there’s a whole world of groups and interests on social media for people who are deaf, while those with hearing loss or tinnitus seem mostly to get together for mutual support and advice on coping day to day. 

      As someone who has both hearing loss and tinnitus, I was drawn to the latter groups. They provide safe spaces for people to say absolutely anything about how they feel about their hearing loss and how it affects their daily lives. I found that fascinating and inspiring. 

      Also, people offer support, empathy, encouragement and advice drawn directly from their own experiences. Anyone newly diagnosed, or struggling for any reason, leaves these sites feeling more cheerful and better able to cope. 

      When a complete stranger shows understanding of what you’re going through, it boosts your confidence. Following conversations over time, I’ve noticed, too, that as people become more resilient, they get better at helping others. These spaces become mutually motivating and supportive communities in the richest sense of the word. I feel privileged to have had even a glimpse into this world. 

      Recent Posts

      Can brain training games help improve your understanding of speech in noisy places

      We often just accept that losing your hearing and struggling to hear in noise is a part of getting older. However, with the world around us getting more and more noisy, problems listening in noise affects more people than we realise. So how can we help people adapt to this increasingly noisy world? Jesal Vishnuram, our Technology Research Manager, tells us more.

      By: Jesal Vishnuram
      11 December 2017

      A new breakthrough towards preventing hearing loss in Usher syndrome

      Researchers in the US have made a breakthrough towards developing a treatment for Usher syndrome using gene therapy. Carina Santos, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us more.

      By: Carina Santos
      11 December 2017

      Understanding more about hearing loss - new research projects

      Our most recent intake of PhD students began their projects in October, and we featured two of the new projects then. Tracey Pollard, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us about the remaining projects and students we’re funding this year.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      11 December 2017

      Keeping in touch has never been easier

      Communicating by phone can be challenging if you or your loved ones have a hearing loss. It’s easy to feel isolated from friends and family. However, there are assistive products available that make keeping in touch much easier, as demonstrated in our latest video.

      By: Sally Bromham
      11 December 2017

      Recent Posts

      Can brain training games help improve your understanding of speech in noisy places

      We often just accept that losing your hearing and struggling to hear in noise is a part of getting older. However, with the world around us getting more and more noisy, problems listening in noise affects more people than we realise. So how can we help people adapt to this increasingly noisy world? Jesal Vishnuram, our Technology Research Manager, tells us more.

      By: Jesal Vishnuram
      11 December 2017

      A new breakthrough towards preventing hearing loss in Usher syndrome

      Researchers in the US have made a breakthrough towards developing a treatment for Usher syndrome using gene therapy. Carina Santos, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us more.

      By: Carina Santos
      11 December 2017

      Understanding more about hearing loss - new research projects

      Our most recent intake of PhD students began their projects in October, and we featured two of the new projects then. Tracey Pollard, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us about the remaining projects and students we’re funding this year.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      11 December 2017

      Keeping in touch has never been easier

      Communicating by phone can be challenging if you or your loved ones have a hearing loss. It’s easy to feel isolated from friends and family. However, there are assistive products available that make keeping in touch much easier, as demonstrated in our latest video.

      By: Sally Bromham
      11 December 2017