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      Equality and public attitudes

      Our research shows that people who are deaf or have hearing loss often feel labelled or limited by attitudes in the workplace or when using everyday services.

      By: Tom Bailey | 09 October 2017

      Findings from opinion poll research we commissioned show that the general public isn’t concerned with the stigma attached to deafness and hearing loss, or about the rights of people who are deaf or have hearing loss.


      But what improvements do people who are deaf or hearing loss want to see in these areas? To find out, and to help shape our new five-year strategy, we asked them, through online surveys and a series of focus group sessions.


      They told us that to improve accessibility of services, changing public attitudes towards deafness and hearing loss was the top priority. When asked to say how and when they felt limited or labelled, they said that television and radio, leisure activities and GP and other NHS services should be priority areas for our future campaigning and influencing work.


      We also interviewed representatives from eight major UK charities to gain a better understanding of what works and what doesn’t work when planning large-scale campaigns to change public attitudes and improve access.


      The interviewees emphasised the importance of clear campaign aims and simple messaging that’s easy for the public to understand. Other charities’ experiences made clear to us that major changes to public attitudes take time. It’s important, too, to be realistic about what we can and can’t achieve.

      Whatever our path, the findings and insights from this research will be invaluable in helping us shape our future work in the years to come.

      Recent Posts

      Can brain training games help improve your understanding of speech in noisy places

      We often just accept that losing your hearing and struggling to hear in noise is a part of getting older. However, with the world around us getting more and more noisy, problems listening in noise affects more people than we realise. So how can we help people adapt to this increasingly noisy world? Jesal Vishnuram, our Technology Research Manager, tells us more.

      By: Jesal Vishnuram
      11 December 2017

      A new breakthrough towards preventing hearing loss in Usher syndrome

      Researchers in the US have made a breakthrough towards developing a treatment for Usher syndrome using gene therapy. Carina Santos, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us more.

      By: Carina Santos
      11 December 2017

      Understanding more about hearing loss - new research projects

      Our most recent intake of PhD students began their projects in October, and we featured two of the new projects then. Tracey Pollard, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us about the remaining projects and students we’re funding this year.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      11 December 2017

      Keeping in touch has never been easier

      Communicating by phone can be challenging if you or your loved ones have a hearing loss. It’s easy to feel isolated from friends and family. However, there are assistive products available that make keeping in touch much easier, as demonstrated in our latest video.

      By: Sally Bromham
      11 December 2017

      Recent Posts

      Can brain training games help improve your understanding of speech in noisy places

      We often just accept that losing your hearing and struggling to hear in noise is a part of getting older. However, with the world around us getting more and more noisy, problems listening in noise affects more people than we realise. So how can we help people adapt to this increasingly noisy world? Jesal Vishnuram, our Technology Research Manager, tells us more.

      By: Jesal Vishnuram
      11 December 2017

      A new breakthrough towards preventing hearing loss in Usher syndrome

      Researchers in the US have made a breakthrough towards developing a treatment for Usher syndrome using gene therapy. Carina Santos, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us more.

      By: Carina Santos
      11 December 2017

      Understanding more about hearing loss - new research projects

      Our most recent intake of PhD students began their projects in October, and we featured two of the new projects then. Tracey Pollard, from our Biomedical Research team, tells us about the remaining projects and students we’re funding this year.

      By: Tracey Pollard
      11 December 2017

      Keeping in touch has never been easier

      Communicating by phone can be challenging if you or your loved ones have a hearing loss. It’s easy to feel isolated from friends and family. However, there are assistive products available that make keeping in touch much easier, as demonstrated in our latest video.

      By: Sally Bromham
      11 December 2017